Western Grebe Draft Recovery Plan

Western Grebe Recovery Plan Draft Online Survey

The public was invite to provide their input to the draft Western Grebe Recovery Plan between December 2, 2018 and January 2, 2019. Twenty-four people responded to the survey. The survey questions, public feedback and our responses are summarized in the "What We Heard" document, in the Document Library to the right.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the western grebe draft recovery plan. Your time and interest are appreciated!


Background

Western grebes are fish-eating waterbirds that live in freshwater lakes throughout much of Alberta, primarily in the central and north-central parts of the province.

Western grebes require large, undisturbed stretches of shoreline vegetation on lakes that have healthy fish populations, relatively stable water levels and water deep enough for diving. The presence of the western grebe is an indication of the overall health and diversity of the lake. The most serious threat to the species is the loss or degradation of intact shoreline reed beds. Other threats include mortality from collisions with power lines, wind turbines and solar panels, oil spills and disturbances from lake users.

In 2014, the western grebe was listed as a threatened species by Minister of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development. Since that listing, previously uncovered records indicate that the population of western grebes and the number of lakes that they inhabit is larger than previously understood. Recovery planning for the western grebe continues, however, as more information is gathered on the population on the province.

Western Grebe Recovery Plan Draft Online Survey

The public was invite to provide their input to the draft Western Grebe Recovery Plan between December 2, 2018 and January 2, 2019. Twenty-four people responded to the survey. The survey questions, public feedback and our responses are summarized in the "What We Heard" document, in the Document Library to the right.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the western grebe draft recovery plan. Your time and interest are appreciated!


Background

Western grebes are fish-eating waterbirds that live in freshwater lakes throughout much of Alberta, primarily in the central and north-central parts of the province.

Western grebes require large, undisturbed stretches of shoreline vegetation on lakes that have healthy fish populations, relatively stable water levels and water deep enough for diving. The presence of the western grebe is an indication of the overall health and diversity of the lake. The most serious threat to the species is the loss or degradation of intact shoreline reed beds. Other threats include mortality from collisions with power lines, wind turbines and solar panels, oil spills and disturbances from lake users.

In 2014, the western grebe was listed as a threatened species by Minister of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development. Since that listing, previously uncovered records indicate that the population of western grebes and the number of lakes that they inhabit is larger than previously understood. Recovery planning for the western grebe continues, however, as more information is gathered on the population on the province.