Draft Peregrine Falcon Recovery Plan

The peregrine falcon, with a dive speed of nearly 400 kilometers per hour, is the world’s fastest animal. Although they have historically nested along the banks of many Alberta rivers, by the 1950s and 1960s, the population of peregrine falcons began to dramatically decrease. By 1970, only three known breeding pairs existed in Alberta.

The cause of this decline was widespread use of a type of pesticide called DDT. A North American ban on DDT was enacted in 1972, and programs for the captive-breeding and re-introduction of peregrine falcons were introduced. Together, these efforts led to a rebound of peregrine

The peregrine falcon, with a dive speed of nearly 400 kilometers per hour, is the world’s fastest animal. Although they have historically nested along the banks of many Alberta rivers, by the 1950s and 1960s, the population of peregrine falcons began to dramatically decrease. By 1970, only three known breeding pairs existed in Alberta.

The cause of this decline was widespread use of a type of pesticide called DDT. A North American ban on DDT was enacted in 1972, and programs for the captive-breeding and re-introduction of peregrine falcons were introduced. Together, these efforts led to a rebound of peregrine populations, with 65 - 75 pairs now estimated to be in Alberta.

Peregrine falcons can easily make a living – they successfully nest on natural cliffs and are spectacular predators. Through careful monitoring and management of their threats, we can ensure Alberta’s peregrine falcon population continues to recover.

The Peregrine Falcon Advisory Group has drafted a plan that identifies the threats facing peregrine falcons, and the actions to address them. Take a moment to review the draft peregrine falcon recovery plan and provide your feedback.


The survey will be available until March 18, 2019.


  • CLOSED: This survey has concluded.
    There are four strategies identified for the recovery of the Alberta peregrine falcon population:
    1. Reduce human disturbance at nest sites.
    2. Manage nesting pairs to reduce the loss of young.
    3. Monitor population size.
    4. Monitor pesticide residue in non-productive eggs.
    The draft recovery plan outlines the associated outcome, progress measure and recovery action for each strategy. 

    The recovery strategies are cost-effective and can be achieved with collaborative efforts and resources of government, industry, conservation groups, agricultural producers and local stewardship groups.

    Read the draft plan and let us know what you think. 
    The survey will be available until March 18, 2019

    Information

    There are four strategies identified for the recovery of the Alberta peregrine falcon population:
    1. Reduce human disturbance at nest sites.
    2. Manage nesting pairs to reduce the loss of young.
    3. Monitor population size.
    4. Monitor pesticide residue in non-productive eggs.
    The draft recovery plan outlines the associated outcome, progress measure and recovery action for each strategy. 

    The recovery strategies are cost-effective and can be achieved with collaborative efforts and resources of government, industry, conservation groups, agricultural producers and local stewardship groups.

    Read the draft plan and let us know what you think. 
    The survey will be available until March 18, 2019

    Information you provide to Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) is collected under the authority of Section 33(c) of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) Act and is managed in accordance with Part 2 of the (FOIP) Act. Your opinions and comments will be used by external stakeholders and the Fish and Wildlife Policy Branch for the purpose of creating Species at Risk (SAR) Recovery Plans for the peregrine falcon. If you are interested in email notifications of future Species at Risk surveys and posting of Species at Risk (SAR) Recovery Plans on the AEP website, please email cindy.kemper@gov.ab.ca with the word 
    “subscribe” in the subject line. Your personal information will not be used or disclosed for any other purpose by AEP without your consent or unless required to do so by law.  Should you wish to have your personal information removed, corrected or have concerns pertaining to the Species at Risk (SAR) Recovery Plans, please contact us at cindy.kemper@gov.ab.ca or call Cindy Kemper at 780 644 8014. 

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