IE10 and below are not supported.

Contact us for any help on browser support

North-Central Native Trout Recovery

AEP Fisheries Management thanks everyone who participated in the North Central Native Trout Recovery Program public survey. We received excellent feedback from more than a thousand anglers and outdoor enthusiasts across Alberta on the proposed recreational fisheries management objectives and regulation changes to support native trout recovery. AEP is in the process of summarizing all of the results of this survey and determining final regulation changes for April 1, 2018.

The survey results show that Albertans have a wide range of opinions relating to the proposed regulation changes in the South Ram River. It is clear that further consultation is required for AEP Fisheries Management to better understand the needs and desires of anglers for the introduced (i.e., stocked -naturalized) cutthroat trout fishery in this watershed.

The purpose of this survey is to ask, "What are your preferred Recreational Fisheries Management Objectives for the cutthroat trout populations in the Ram River watershed?"

NOTE: The closing date of the Ram River Public Survey has been extended to November 30th, 2017, at 4:30 p.m.

AEP Fisheries Management thanks everyone who participated in the North Central Native Trout Recovery Program public survey. We received excellent feedback from more than a thousand anglers and outdoor enthusiasts across Alberta on the proposed recreational fisheries management objectives and regulation changes to support native trout recovery. AEP is in the process of summarizing all of the results of this survey and determining final regulation changes for April 1, 2018.

The survey results show that Albertans have a wide range of opinions relating to the proposed regulation changes in the South Ram River. It is clear that further consultation is required for AEP Fisheries Management to better understand the needs and desires of anglers for the introduced (i.e., stocked -naturalized) cutthroat trout fishery in this watershed.

The purpose of this survey is to ask, "What are your preferred Recreational Fisheries Management Objectives for the cutthroat trout populations in the Ram River watershed?"

NOTE: The closing date of the Ram River Public Survey has been extended to November 30th, 2017, at 4:30 p.m.

  • Ram River Watershed Cutthroat Trout Sportfishing Regulations

    8 months ago

    NOTE: The closing date of the Ram River Public Survey has been extended to November 30th, 2017, at 4:30 p.m.

    The purpose of this survey is to ask, “What are your preferred Recreational Fisheries Management Objectives for the cutthroat trout populations in the Ram River watershed?”

    What is a Recreation Fisheries Management Objective?

    The overarching goal for recreational fisheries management in Alberta is to have fisheries producing ecological, social and economic benefits by being managed for long term sustainability and use. Managing recreational fisheries in Alberta requires an understanding of the complex interplay of biological requirements, habitat threats and invasive species while addressing the needs and desires of a diversity of stakeholders.

    A Recreational Fisheries Management Objective (RFMO) is a shared vision of a fishery that considers the needs and desires of anglers and the biological limitations of a fish population.

    • RFMOs are based on sound science, best available information, and stakeholder consultation
    • RFMOs can change over time if there is a change in the needs of anglers or biological limitations of a fish population
    • RFMOs are applied to an entire population of fish; a population of fish may inhabit a lake or a network of streams and rivers in a watershed
    • RFMOs are achieved by applying sportfishing regulations based on science

    Cutthroat Trout in Alberta

    Cutthroat trout are a cold water fish species that live in lakes and rivers. They require intact and connected habitat to carry out their life processes. They spawn in the spring, although spawning can take place as late as early July in high mountain streams. In Alberta, westslope cutthroat trout are native to the mountain and foothill streams of southern Alberta within the Oldman River and Bow River watersheds. Cutthroat trout have been successfully introduced to several watersheds outside of their native range.

    The Ram River Cutthroat Trout Fishery

    Historically, the Ram River watershed was fishless upstream of the lowest set of falls located just downstream of the confluence with the North Ram River (SE-11-38-12-W5). Cutthroat trout were stocked during the 1950s and 1970s to create a recreational fishery. Similarly, Fall Creek, a tributary to the lower Ram, was also fishless above a waterfall and stocked with cutthroat trout in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, there are self-sustaining cutthroat trout populations throughout the Ram River watershed that provide important recreational sportfishing opportunities. Other species, such as bull trout and mountain whitefish, are only found in the lowest portion of the Ram River.

    Cutthroat Trout Regulations in the Ram River Watershed (see below)

    • From 1986 to 1998, Ram River angling regulations focused on a restricted angling timing of June 16 to Oct 31 upstream of the North Ram River, with General Regulations applying to the rest of the Ram River: Open all year with bait bans and some size and harvest restrictions on specific species.
    • In 1999, a portion of the Ram River, known as the South Ram River from Ram Falls downstream to Fall Creek, was designated as catch and release only. The purpose of this change was to provide opportunity to catch large cutthroat trout (e.g., fish larger than 50 cm or 20 inches).
    • In 2010, Fall Creek below the falls (11-31-37-11-W5) was closed to sportfishing to protect a highly sensitive portion of the Ram River bull trout population.
    • Currently, there are six different suites of regulations in the Ram River watershed, including a mix of seasonal closure windows, harvest regulations, catch-and-release regulations and closed waters.

    For maps showing 2017 sportfishing regulations in the Ram River watershed and future regulation zones, please see:

    NOTE: The closing date of the Ram River Public Survey has been extended to November 30th, 2017, at 4:30 p.m.

    The purpose of this survey is to ask, “What are your preferred Recreational Fisheries Management Objectives for the cutthroat trout populations in the Ram River watershed?”

    What is a Recreation Fisheries Management Objective?

    The overarching goal for recreational fisheries management in Alberta is to have fisheries producing ecological, social and economic benefits by being managed for long term sustainability and use. Managing recreational fisheries in Alberta requires an understanding of the complex interplay of biological requirements, habitat threats and invasive species while addressing the needs and desires of a diversity of stakeholders.

    A Recreational Fisheries Management Objective (RFMO) is a shared vision of a fishery that considers the needs and desires of anglers and the biological limitations of a fish population.

    • RFMOs are based on sound science, best available information, and stakeholder consultation
    • RFMOs can change over time if there is a change in the needs of anglers or biological limitations of a fish population
    • RFMOs are applied to an entire population of fish; a population of fish may inhabit a lake or a network of streams and rivers in a watershed
    • RFMOs are achieved by applying sportfishing regulations based on science

    Cutthroat Trout in Alberta

    Cutthroat trout are a cold water fish species that live in lakes and rivers. They require intact and connected habitat to carry out their life processes. They spawn in the spring, although spawning can take place as late as early July in high mountain streams. In Alberta, westslope cutthroat trout are native to the mountain and foothill streams of southern Alberta within the Oldman River and Bow River watersheds. Cutthroat trout have been successfully introduced to several watersheds outside of their native range.

    The Ram River Cutthroat Trout Fishery

    Historically, the Ram River watershed was fishless upstream of the lowest set of falls located just downstream of the confluence with the North Ram River (SE-11-38-12-W5). Cutthroat trout were stocked during the 1950s and 1970s to create a recreational fishery. Similarly, Fall Creek, a tributary to the lower Ram, was also fishless above a waterfall and stocked with cutthroat trout in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, there are self-sustaining cutthroat trout populations throughout the Ram River watershed that provide important recreational sportfishing opportunities. Other species, such as bull trout and mountain whitefish, are only found in the lowest portion of the Ram River.

    Cutthroat Trout Regulations in the Ram River Watershed (see below)

    • From 1986 to 1998, Ram River angling regulations focused on a restricted angling timing of June 16 to Oct 31 upstream of the North Ram River, with General Regulations applying to the rest of the Ram River: Open all year with bait bans and some size and harvest restrictions on specific species.
    • In 1999, a portion of the Ram River, known as the South Ram River from Ram Falls downstream to Fall Creek, was designated as catch and release only. The purpose of this change was to provide opportunity to catch large cutthroat trout (e.g., fish larger than 50 cm or 20 inches).
    • In 2010, Fall Creek below the falls (11-31-37-11-W5) was closed to sportfishing to protect a highly sensitive portion of the Ram River bull trout population.
    • Currently, there are six different suites of regulations in the Ram River watershed, including a mix of seasonal closure windows, harvest regulations, catch-and-release regulations and closed waters.

    For maps showing 2017 sportfishing regulations in the Ram River watershed and future regulation zones, please see: