Go FISH!

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Reel in some action all summer long - we're bringing a new splash to the classic 'Go fish' game!

Go FISH! is for novice and avid anglers alike to take part in responsible angling practices and hone their fishing skills. Instead of collecting pairs of cards, you'll be collecting new skills and memories as you complete challenges in these categories:

  • Fishing in your community,
  • Identification
  • Safety
  • Habitat,
  • ! Act now

There are two ways to play; one is to download a photo of the bingo card to your phone and check off the challenges as you

Reel in some action all summer long - we're bringing a new splash to the classic 'Go fish' game!

Go FISH! is for novice and avid anglers alike to take part in responsible angling practices and hone their fishing skills. Instead of collecting pairs of cards, you'll be collecting new skills and memories as you complete challenges in these categories:

  • Fishing in your community,
  • Identification
  • Safety
  • Habitat,
  • ! Act now

There are two ways to play; one is to download a photo of the bingo card to your phone and check off the challenges as you go, or use the challenge board below, and hit the like button for each challenge as you complete it.

This page will be your virtual tackle box - so make sure to check out all of the resources to help you Go FISH! Once you've completed a challenge in each category, fill out the survey below for the chance to add something useful to your own tackle box. If you complete all of the challenges we have available, you will be entered to win an extra prize! You have until October 31st to complete challenges and fill out the survey.

To participate, please log in or set up an account with Talk AEP! Continue to check back here throughout the season for updates and opportunities that will take you to new waters.


Privacy Statement

All comments, including any personal information you provide in your comments or username used to register to participate are posted when adding a pin to the map under the Fishing Locations tab and are publicly available. Therefore, DO NOT INCLUDE ANY PERSONAL INFORMATION IN YOUR COMMENTS OR USERNAME. Comments collected under the Challenges and Submit for a Prize tabs will not be posted publicly.

Comments regarding Fisheries Education are collected under the authorization of Section 33(c) of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) Act and are managed in accordance with Part 2 of the FOIP Act. Your personal information, if included, will be removed for internal purposes (but not from our website comments page) and the comments aggregated and used to inform fisheries education programs and products. The personal information will be used to provide prizes in recognition of completing responsible angling and stewardship actions, beyond this purpose it will not be used or disclosed for any other purpose than stated, without your specific written consent or unless required to do so by law. Should you wish to have your personal information removed, corrected or have any other questions, please contact the AEP Information Centre, Community Engagement Branch at: 780-310-3773 or: 1-877-944-0313 to be connected toll-free from outside the Edmonton area.

Do you have questions about fish or fishing in Alberta?  Ask the experts here! We will post answers to frequently asked questions below.

Ask a fisheries biologist

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    If a species is catch and release only, but dies before you can release it (ie: swallowed the hook, by the time you can get the hook out safety the fish has died), should you release a dead fish back into the water? Dispose of it elsewhere? Keep it?

    FishinQs asked about 2 months ago

    Even in catch and release fisheries, a small proportion of fish may be killed accidentally by anglers.  Fisheries biologists account for this in making decisions about how to manage a fishery.  Catch and release fishing rules require all fish to be released back into the water in which it was caught, without exception.  Fish that are killed accidentally and put back, or severely injured and die after being released are not wasted; they will become food for scavenger organisms and part of a healthy aquatic ecosystem.  To minimize risk of accidentally killing a fish, please follow our advice on proper fish handling techniques.

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    Could you please tell me what the differences are between the different types of Rainbow trout you stock here in Alberta and why we stock all the different varieties?

    pluedemann asked about 2 months ago

    Alberta’s rainbow trout stocking program uses different strains of trout to obtain a good fit with the habitat conditions and the wishes of anglers.  Some strains are more tolerant of warmer water or higher alkalinity.  While other strains grow faster or larger.  Sometimes, we simply stock different strains to evaluate how well they do, or our fish hatchery managers take advantage of better prices for fertilized eggs.  From time to time, disease issues in egg suppliers can also affect the availability of certain strains.        

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    Why haven’t there been efforts to restock Wabamun Lake with whitefish....the pike and walleye don’t have much of a forage base right now...the reintroduction of whitefish or a similar high protein fatty fish could turn this lake into a trophy lake,correct me if I’m wrong.

    Waves’nWalleyes asked about 2 months ago

    The lake whitefish population in Wabamun Lake is self-sustaining.  Stocking a species of fish “on top” of a sustainable natural population of that species often fails to achieve any increase in abundance and may bring risk of unwanted disease or genetic consequences.  It’s usually better to manage fish populations for natural sustainability, by using good management and protecting habitat.  Alberta doesn’t have a lake whitefish stocking program.

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    Why not develop perch fish ponds? too much focus on all these trout stocking programs! no one i know prefers trout of any kind over perch, walleye or even northern pike.

    bnoullett asked about 2 months ago

    We’re so happy you love perch.  We do too!  Yellow perch are a popular fish for anglers to target.  In their natural habitats, they can thrive and provide sustainable fishing opportunities.  Plus, they make for a great meal!  The downside to perch is that they are slow-growing and maturing.  It usually takes 8 to 10 years for a perch to reach a size that appeals to anglers.  Compare that to a stocked rainbow trout that can reach catchable size in 1 year and a memorable size in two years.  In order for ponds stocked with perch to become attractive fishing opportunities, there would need to be very restrictive fishing regulations in place to ensure the stocked fish live long enough to meet anglers’ needs.  Surveys have informed us that many anglers, particularly families, want to be able to go to stocked ponds and have fishing and fish harvest opportunities with simple regulations.  Surveys also tell us that anglers find ponds with only small perch unappealing.  Trout are also very cost-effective to raise in hatcheries.  While we don’t raise perch in our hatcheries, that doesn’t mean we never stock yellow perch.  From time to time, we transfer perch (and pike) from donor waters to lakes that have experienced winterkill, in an effort to re-establish fish populations.

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    Can we use worms at Chain Lake Provincial Park ? What is the fishing regulations at this location?

    Fidan asked 4 months ago

    Hello Fidan! 

    The sportfishing regulations for Chain Lakes Reservoir can be found on Page 16 of the sportfishing regulations guide as it is part of the Alberta fish stocking program. Here's what the regulations say: 

    • Open all year 
    • Bait is allowed 
    • 5 trout of any size 

    Please also see the section on Page 20 of the sportfishing regulations guide showing general regulations that apply to all waters. 

    Have fun fishing!