Ferruginous Hawk Draft Recovery plan

The survey is now closed.

Thank you to those who provided their input! We appreciate your time and feedback. Once the results have been analyzed, we will publish a summary of what we heard.

Thanks again!

The ferruginous hawk is the largest of Alberta’s hawks. It can be found in the southern prairies of Alberta during the spring and summer months and in the southwest United States and Mexico during the winter months. Ferruginous hawk populations were in dramatic decline until 2000 and have since stabilized at historically low numbers.

In 2006, the Endangered Species Conservation Committee (ESCC), including stakeholders from agriculture, industry, conservation organizations, Indigenous communities, and the scientific/academic community, recommended to the (then) Minister of Sustainable Resource Development that the ferruginous hawk be listed as endangered.

Once that recommendation was accepted by the Minister, the Wildlife Act required that a recovery plan be developed. The Alberta Government, in partnership with a number of stakeholders, formed the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Team. This team developed recovery strategies which were outlined in the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Plan 2009 – 2014. The team reconvened from 2015 - 2017 to evaluate the plan and to draft an updated strategy that builds upon the success of the 2009 – 2014 plan and re-calibrates actions where necessary.

The population of ferruginous hawks can recover. The threats to the species are local, and there is potential to reduce these threats. Please review the attached draft recovery plan and take the survey to provide feedback on the threats, proposed recovery goal, and strategies.

The survey deadline has been extended to February 28, 2019.

The survey is now closed.

Thank you to those who provided their input! We appreciate your time and feedback. Once the results have been analyzed, we will publish a summary of what we heard.

Thanks again!

The ferruginous hawk is the largest of Alberta’s hawks. It can be found in the southern prairies of Alberta during the spring and summer months and in the southwest United States and Mexico during the winter months. Ferruginous hawk populations were in dramatic decline until 2000 and have since stabilized at historically low numbers.

In 2006, the Endangered Species Conservation Committee (ESCC), including stakeholders from agriculture, industry, conservation organizations, Indigenous communities, and the scientific/academic community, recommended to the (then) Minister of Sustainable Resource Development that the ferruginous hawk be listed as endangered.

Once that recommendation was accepted by the Minister, the Wildlife Act required that a recovery plan be developed. The Alberta Government, in partnership with a number of stakeholders, formed the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Team. This team developed recovery strategies which were outlined in the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Plan 2009 – 2014. The team reconvened from 2015 - 2017 to evaluate the plan and to draft an updated strategy that builds upon the success of the 2009 – 2014 plan and re-calibrates actions where necessary.

The population of ferruginous hawks can recover. The threats to the species are local, and there is potential to reduce these threats. Please review the attached draft recovery plan and take the survey to provide feedback on the threats, proposed recovery goal, and strategies.

The survey deadline has been extended to February 28, 2019.

  • CLOSED: This survey has concluded.

    The Alberta Government, in partnership with a number of stakeholders, formed the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Team. The team developed the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Plan 2009 – 2014 and reconvened from 2015 - 2017 to evaluate the plan and to draft an updated strategy.

    The seven proposed recovery strategies to recover the ferruginous hawk in Alberta are as follows:

    • Reduce human disturbance at nest sites
    • Maintain existing grasslands and pasture lands on both public and private land
    • Ensure adequate number of nest structures in suitable habitat
    • Maintain and enhance prey populations

    The Alberta Government, in partnership with a number of stakeholders, formed the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Team. The team developed the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Plan 2009 – 2014 and reconvened from 2015 - 2017 to evaluate the plan and to draft an updated strategy.

    The seven proposed recovery strategies to recover the ferruginous hawk in Alberta are as follows:

    • Reduce human disturbance at nest sites
    • Maintain existing grasslands and pasture lands on both public and private land
    • Ensure adequate number of nest structures in suitable habitat
    • Maintain and enhance prey populations for ferruginous hawks
    • Reduce human-caused mortality of ferruginous hawks
    • Limit the impacts of predators and competing bird species; and
    • Conservation of ferruginous hawks during the migration and on their wintering grounds

    Implementation of these strategies will be carried out by both government and non-government partners.

    Please review the attached draft recovery plan and provide feedback on the threats, recovery goal and strategies proposed by the Alberta Ferruginous Hawk Recovery Team.


    The survey deadline has been extended to February 28, 2019

    Information you provide to Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) is collected under the authority of Section 33(c) of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) Act and is managed in accordance with Part 2 of the (FOIP) Act. Your opinions and comments will be used by external stakeholders and the Fish and Wildlife Policy Branch for the purpose of creating Species at Risk (SAR) Recovery Plans for the ferruginous hawk. If you are interested in email notifications of future Species at Risk surveys and posting of Species at Risk (SAR) Recovery Plans on the AEP website, please email cindy.kemper@gov.ab.ca with the word 
    “subscribe” in the subject line. Your personal information will not be used or disclosed for any other purpose by AEP without your consent or unless required to do so by law.  Should you wish to have your personal information removed, corrected or have concerns pertaining to the Species at Risk (SAR) Recovery Plans, please contact us at cindy.kemper@gov.ab.ca or call Cindy Kemper at 780 644 8014. 

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